Double Balloon Enteroscopy in a North American Setting: A Large Single Center 5-year Experience


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Seven G.

Intestinal Research, cilt.11, sa.1, ss.34-40, 2013 (ESCI İndekslerine Giren Dergi)

  • Cilt numarası: 11 Konu: 1
  • Basım Tarihi: 2013
  • Doi Numarası: 10.5217/ir.2013.11.1.34
  • Dergi Adı: Intestinal Research
  • Sayfa Sayıları: ss.34-40

Özet

Background/Aims: Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) allows both diagnosis and therapeutic maneuvers in the small bowel. Its use was pioneered in Europe and Asia but there remains a relative paucity of literature from North America. Our aim in this study was to determine diagnostic and therapeutic yield in a North American setting. Methods: A five-year retrospective analy-sis of all patients undergoing DBE at a single tertiary care North American hospital was performed. Results: Four-hundred fifty-seven procedures, 265 anterograde and 192 retrograde, were performed on 335 patients. The most common indications were obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, small bowel obstruction, and suspected masses and mucosal abnormalities. Total en-teroscopy was achieved in 19 of the 89 patients who had both anterograde and retrograde procedures. Overall diagnostic yield in the determination of cause of symptoms or previous imaging was 52%. The most common causes of obscure bleeding were small bowel ulcers (10%), vascular lesions (25%) and neoplasms (10%). The most common causes of small bowel obstruction were strictures, some of which underwent dilation. Other therapeutic interventions included polypectomy, retrieval of retained capsules, stent retrievals and percutaneous enteral jejunostomy tube placement. Overall complication rates were very low (0.6%) and included medication reaction (n=1), scope dysfunction (n=1) and perforation (n=1). Conclusions: DBE can be per-formed safely and with good diagnostic yield in a single referral center in North America. (Intest Res 2013;11:34-40Background/Aims: Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) allows both diagnosis and therapeutic maneuvers in the small bowel.
Its use was pioneered in Europe and Asia but there remains a relative paucity of literature from North America. Our aim in this
study was to determine diagnostic and therapeutic yield in a North American setting. Methods: A five-year retrospective analy-
sis of all patients undergoing DBE at a single tertiary care North American hospital was performed. Results: Four-hundred
fifty-seven procedures, 265 anterograde and 192 retrograde, were performed on 335 patients. The most common indications
were obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, small bowel obstruction, and suspected masses and mucosal abnormalities. Total en-
teroscopy was achieved in 19 of the 89 patients who had both anterograde and retrograde procedures. Overall diagnostic yield
in the determination of cause of symptoms or previous imaging was 52%. The most common causes of obscure bleeding were
small bowel ulcers (10%), vascular lesions (25%) and neoplasms (10%). The most common causes of small bowel obstruction
were strictures, some of which underwent dilation. Other therapeutic interventions included polypectomy, retrieval of retained
capsules, stent retrievals and percutaneous enteral jejunostomy tube placement. Overall complication rates were very low
(0.6%) and included medication reaction (n=1), scope dysfunction (n=1) and perforation (n=1). Conclusions: DBE can be per-
formed safely and with good diagnostic yield in a single referral center in North America. (Intest Res 2013;11:34-40Background/Aims: Double balloon enteroscopy (DBE) allows both diagnosis and therapeutic maneuvers in the small bowel.
Its use was pioneered in Europe and Asia but there remains a relative paucity of literature from North America. Our aim in this
study was to determine diagnostic and therapeutic yield in a North American setting. Methods: A five-year retrospective analy-
sis of all patients undergoing DBE at a single tertiary care North American hospital was performed. Results: Four-hundred
fifty-seven procedures, 265 anterograde and 192 retrograde, were performed on 335 patients. The most common indications
were obscure gastrointestinal bleeding, small bowel obstruction, and suspected masses and mucosal abnormalities. Total en-
teroscopy was achieved in 19 of the 89 patients who had both anterograde and retrograde procedures. Overall diagnostic yield
in the determination of cause of symptoms or previous imaging was 52%. The most common causes of obscure bleeding were
small bowel ulcers (10%), vascular lesions (25%) and neoplasms (10%). The most common causes of small bowel obstruction
were strictures, some of which underwent dilation. Other therapeutic interventions included polypectomy, retrieval of retained
capsules, stent retrievals and percutaneous enteral jejunostomy tube placement. Overall complication rates were very low
(0.6%) and included medication reaction (n=1), scope dysfunction (n=1) and perforation (n=1). Conclusions: DBE can be per-
formed safely and with good diagnostic yield in a single referral center in North America. (Intest Res 2013;11:34-40